Remnants of Tropical Storm Kay bring slight chance of rain to the Bay Area

NO LATER THAN September 10, 9:30 a.m.

While the remnants of Tropical Storm Kay bring significant rainfall to Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area is expected to see an increase in cloud cover and moisture in the air, but little to none. rain.

Just south of the Bay Area, Monterey County received a few scattered splashes, but Jeff Lorber, a National Weather Service meteorologist, said the downpours dissipated as they moved north.

“Rain is falling in areas right next to our office in Monterey and the Central Valley,” Lorber said. “But it’s not making its way far north of Monterey. Got a report from someone working in the East Bay who saw splashing on one of the passes near Livermore.

The slight chance of rain in the Bay Area continues into Sunday. KNTV meteorologist Rob Mayeda wrote about Twitter that the best chance of rain in the Bay Area on Saturday is in the South Bay.

“There is a non-zero chance of showers in the Bay Area, but the strongest confidence remains on the Central Coast,” said Saturday’s forecast from the Weather Service’s Bay Area office. “The persistent overland flow will result in calmer weather and a trend towards cooler temperatures over the next working week.”

September 9, 9 a.m.

The California Heat wave that brought grueling temperatures to the San Francisco Bay Area is finally coming to an end. Friday marks the start of a cooling with the return of fog and the remnants of Hurricane Kay reaching the region this weekend.

Afternoon highs in the Bay Area on Friday will be 5 to 10 degrees cooler than they were Thursday and 15 to 20 degrees cooler than they were at the height of the heat wave on Tuesday, the National Weather Service said. Livermore soared to 116 degrees on Tuesday and is expected to hit 102 on Friday and 88 on Saturday. San Francisco hit 98 on Tuesday and is expected to hit 76 on Friday and 74 on Saturday.

“That should definitely be a big relief,” said Sarah McCorkle, forecaster with the weather service’s Monterey office.

The cooler weather is coming in as a trough of low pressure to the north, and the remnants of Hurricane Kay to the south are breaking down the high pressure ridge that caused the intense warming.

“We have two low pressure systems that are squeezing us to the north and south and that’s helping to weaken the high pressure,” McCorkle said.

The waning high pressure has opened the door to coastal fog, and McCorkle said the marine layer that’s only been a few hundred feet thick in recent days is up to 1,000 to 1,500 feet deep off the coast. Monterey this morning.

“The marine layer has deepened, so people in interior valleys and higher elevations should also feel cooler,” she said. “We expect fog to return to San Francisco tomorrow.”

A man covers himself from the rain with a broken umbrella after heavy rains in Mexico City due to Hurricane Kay passing through the state of Baja California in the Mexican Republic, which will maintain the rain forecast for several states in the country .

A man covers himself from the rain with a broken umbrella after heavy rains in Mexico City due to Hurricane Kay passing through the state of Baja California in the Mexican Republic, which will maintain the rain forecast for several states in the country .

NurPhoto via Getty Images

Hurricane Kay brings a slight chance of rain to the San Francisco Bay Area this weekend

Tropical Storm Kay made landfall in Mexico Thursday morning as a hurricane, and last night was downgraded to a tropical storm. The storm is expected to move north over the Pacific Ocean parallel to the California coast, with its eastern edge brushing southern California on Friday and Saturday, bringing significant rainfall, up to 2.5 inches to the wettest places.

The remnants of the storm will move into northern California Saturday through Sunday. Confidence is high that the system could produce rain and wet thunderstorms in southern parts of Monterey and San Benito counties Saturday night and Sunday morning. “There’s a 20% to 40% chance of rain,” McCorkle said.

Parts of Southern California woke up to light rain Thursday morning during the ongoing heat wave in Los Angeles.  According to Ryan Kittell, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard, the rainfall was splashed over the Los Angeles Valley and coastal areas, a preview of the rain from Hurricane Kay.

Parts of Southern California woke up to light rain Thursday morning during the ongoing heat wave in Los Angeles. According to Ryan Kittell, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard, the rainfall was splashed over the Los Angeles Valley and coastal areas, a preview of the rain from Hurricane Kay.

Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

McCorkle said the chance of rain in the nine-county Bay Area is much lower. “There is a chance that from Saturday evening to Sunday morning the Bay Area could see scattered showers,” she said. “I would give them a 10% chance. »

Even if the storm does not bring wetting rain, it will produce clouds that will help raise humidity levels and reduce the risk of wildfires.

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