Mississippi State responds to water crisis in Jackson

The State of Mississippi is mobilizing to respond to the failure of Jackson’s water treatment system. During an emergency briefing Monday night, Gov. Tate Reeves said the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency was setting up a command center Tuesday at the OB Curtis water treatment plant. Gov. Reeves State leaders said they plan to work with local city officials to assess and correct issues at the troubled water treatment facility. residents will now experience low water pressure for at least the next few days. The mayor says that due to the flow of water from the Ross Barnett Reservoir in response to heavy rains and flooding, the OB Curtis water treatment plant is now facing complications to treat the water that enter the factory. Governor Delbert Hosemann and Mississippi House Speaker Phillip Gunn released statements about the Jackson water crisis Monday afternoon. Hosemann said in a statement, “Our understanding is that the water and sewer system serving 250,000 state citizens and many businesses is on the verge of collapse. We are very concerned about the health and safety of citizens. It is obvious that the cities served by the system do not have the assets to deal with this problem in a timely and efficient way in the long term. I think it’s time for the state to play an active role in finding a solution, both short and long term. Gunn released this statement on the water crisis: “I have been contacted by hospitals, businesses and schools advocating for something to be done to address the water crisis in Jackson. Unfortunately, the city management did not present a permanent solution or an overall plan. These groups have turned to the state for help, and it looks like we’ll have to assess what options might be available. State Senators Hillman Frazier, John Horhn, Walter Michel, David Blount and Sollie Norwood wrote a letter to Gov. Tate Reeves on Monday, requesting a special session to address Jackson’s water crisis. Mayor Lumumba has declared a water system emergency. In a statement, the mayor’s office said that “contrary to some reports, the city is NOT turning off water to residents.” major work to restore the reservoirs to sufficient levels. According to Lumumba, the city’s ongoing water problems are the result of decades of deferred maintenance and staff shortages. The mayor says people are trained to become certified water operators, but the training process is long; take up to two years for those with a science degree and up to six years without a university degree. The city says it is working to find a third-party contractor to help run the OB Curtis water treatment plant. The city has suspended drinking water sampling due to loss of water pressure. Technicians need two consecutive days of clean water samples to lift the citywide boil water advisory. Due to water shortages and the failure of OB Curtis, some schools and universities have gone virtual.

The State of Mississippi is mobilizing to respond to the failure of Jackson’s water treatment system.

During an emergency briefing Monday night, Gov. Tate Reeves said the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency was setting up a command center Tuesday at the OB Curtis water treatment plant.

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

Governor Reeves said state leaders plan to work with local city officials to assess and correct issues at the troubled water treatment facility.

Jackson residents on the city’s surface water system have already been on a boil water advisory for weeks and now Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba has said all residents will now be facing low water pressure for at least the next few days.

Mayor says that due to the flow of water from the Ross Barnett Reservoir in response to heavy rain and flooding, the OB Curtis water treatment plant is now facing complications in treating the water who enters the factory.

Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann and Mississippi House Speaker Phillip Gunn released statements about the Jackson water crisis Monday afternoon.

Hosemann said in a statement:

“Our understanding is that the water and sewer system serving 250,000 citizens in the state and many businesses is on the verge of collapse. We are very concerned about the health and safety of citizens. It is obvious that the cities served by the system do not have the assets to deal with this problem in a timely and effective way in the long term. I think it is time for the State to play an active role in the search for a solution, short and long term.

Gunn released this statement on the water crisis:

“I have been contacted by hospitals, businesses and schools advocating for something to be done to solve the water crisis in Jackson. Unfortunately, the city management did not present a permanent solution or an overall plan. These groups have turned to the state for help, and it looks like we’ll have to assess what options might be available.

State Senators Hillman Frazier, John Horhn, Walter Michel, David Blount and Sollie Norwood wrote a letter to Gov. Tate Reeves on Monday, requesting a special session to address Jackson’s water crisis.

letter from state senators requesting special session on water crisis in Jackson

Mayor Lumumba has declared a water system emergency. In a statement, the mayor’s office said that “contrary to some reports, the city is NOT shutting off water to residents.”

The mayor said reducing water flow from the reservoir will help restore water pressure in the treatment plant’s tanks, but it will take significant work to bring the tanks back to sufficient levels.

According to Lumumba, the city’s ongoing water problems are the result of decades of deferred maintenance and staff shortages.

The mayor says people are trained to become certified water operators, but the training process is long; take up to two years for those with a science degree and up to six years without a university degree.

The city says it is working to find a third-party contractor to help run the OB Curtis water treatment plant.

The city has suspended drinking water sampling due to loss of water pressure. Technicians need two consecutive days of clean water samples to lift the citywide boil water advisory.

Due to water shortages and the failure of OB Curtis, some schools and universities have gone virtual.

Leave a Comment