MBTA schedules will remain reduced in the fall despite 30-day Orange Line fixes

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority estimates that about 16% of work scheduled for the Orange Line’s 30-day shutdown has been completed. I really want to thank everyone involved, our users, the public, our municipal partners for their patience,” MBTA CEO Steve Poftak said Wednesday. “We are delighted with the progress we are making. “We certainly know there are areas where we can improve and we will continue to do so.” A fleet of 200 buses is being used to transport Orange Line riders to their destinations over the next month. said many customers have chosen to use the MBTA Commuter Rail service. “We are seeing a significant increase in ridership on both the north side and the south side,” Poftak said. “Not all seats are filled, but we have seen a significant increase on some trains.” Poftak said extra carriages would be added to some peak hour trains on the Needham line and the Haverhill line. “Please consider the commuter rail. In many cases it’s a much faster alternative to shuttles,” Poftak said. The 11-mile Orange Line, from Oak Grove stations to Forest Hills , are expected to remain closed until 5 a.m. Sept. 19. include track repairs to eliminate traffic jams, signal upgrades, infrastructure replacement, and repairs or upgrades at various stations in as part of what the MBTA calls major revitalization and safety work on the Orange Line Poftak said crews have completed replacing the rail between Downtown Crossing and State Street stations “This allows us to remove one of the six slow-moving areas we aim to address during this shutdown,” Poftak said. The T provides shuttles between stations, and the city has reserved bus lanes reserved for certain streets. The rail lines commuters also operate with increased frequency. keep avoiding those routes when driving,” Poftak said. “If you must drive near these routes, please respect the various bus infrastructure we have in place, especially the dedicated bus lanes. And stay away from the shuttles.” taken five years in the working period of one month. However, Poftak said ongoing work on the Orange Line would not allow the MBTA to return to normal weekday service after the 30-day shutdown. “We’re working hard to get back into a position where we can run more trains, but that’s going to require us to train more dispatchers, and it’s not that it’s not a process that’s going to happen immediately,” Poftak said. “Our priority will always be safety and we put safety first in this case,” Poftak said. “Until we feel we have an adequate level of staffing at the OCC, we will maintain in place the level of service that we believe we can safely perform.” Poftak escaped an upcoming announcement from the transit agency. The Orange Line provides around 101,000 journeys each day, so the impact of the closure on commuters is expected to be major. Officials said creating a path for buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to projections made by engineers who model traffic for MassDOT. Motorists have been warned to expect a sharp increase in traffic, particularly on roads along shuttle routes. The frequency of commuter trains has been increased to take into account anticipated changes in travel habits. Passengers can also use the commuter train free of charge in zones 1, 1A and 2 by presenting a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket. As an alternative, Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to use BlueBikes during the shutdown. The City of Boston and MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA Call Center: 617-222-3200. Officials said the “impetus” for closing the Orange Line was a safety review by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA file since May after a man was dragged to death at the red line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released in the coming weeks.

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority estimates that about 16% of work scheduled for the Orange Line’s 30-day shutdown has been completed.

I really want to thank everyone involved, our riders, the public, our municipal partners for their patience,” MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak said Wednesday. “We are delighted with the progress we are making.

Poftak thinks the transit alternatives put in place have gone relatively well. “We certainly know there are areas where we can improve and we will continue to do so.”

A fleet of 200 buses is being used to transport Orange Line riders to their destinations over the next month.

However, Poftak said many customers have chosen to use the MBTA Commuter Rail service.

“We are seeing a significant increase in ridership on both the north side and the south side,” Poftak said. “Not all seats are filled, but we have seen a significant increase on some trains.”

Poftak said extra carriages would be added to some peak hour trains on the Needham and Haverhill lines.

“Please consider commuter rail. In many cases it’s a much faster alternative to shuttles,” Poftak said.

The 11 miles of the Orange Line, from Oak Grove to Forest Hills stations, are expected to remain closed until 5 a.m. on September 19.

Planned projects include track repairs to eliminate slowdowns, upgrade signals, replace infrastructure, and fix or upgrade various stations as part of what the MBTA calls major revitalization and safety work on the Orange Line.

Poftak said crews completed the rail replacement between Downtown Crossing and State Street stations over the weekend. “It allows us to remove one of the six slow areas that we aim to address in this shutdown,” Poftak said.

The T offers shuttles between the stations and the city has reserved lanes reserved for buses in certain streets. Commuter rail lines are also operating with increased frequency.

Poftak said reducing traffic along shuttle routes has been key to shuttle operations. “I want to ask people to continue to avoid these routes when driving,” Poftak said. “If you must drive near these routes, please respect the various bus infrastructure we have in place, especially the dedicated bus lanes. And stay away from the shuttles.”

Officials said they could cut work that would normally have taken five years into the one-month work period.

However, Poftak said ongoing work on the Orange Line would not allow the MBTA to return to normal weekday service after the 30-day shutdown.

“We’re working hard to get back into a position where we can run more trains, but that’s going to require us to train more dispatchers, and it’s not that it’s not a process that’s going to happen immediately,” Poftak said.

“Our priority will always be safety and we put safety first in this case,” Poftak said. “Until we feel we have an adequate level of staff at the OCC, we will maintain the level of service in place that we believe we can safely perform.”

Poftak escaped an upcoming announcement from the transit agency.

The Orange Line provides around 101,000 journeys each day, so the impact of the closure on commuters is expected to be major.

Officials said creating a path for buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to projections made by engineers who model traffic for MassDOT. Motorists have been warned to expect a sharp increase in traffic, particularly on roads along shuttle routes.

The frequency of commuter trains has been increased to take into account anticipated changes in travel habits. Passengers can also use the commuter train free of charge in zones 1, 1A and 2 by presenting a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket.

As an alternative, Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to use BlueBikes during the shutdown.

The City of Boston and the MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA call center: 617-222-3200.

Officials said the “impetus” for closing the Orange Line was a safety review by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA file since May after a man was dragged to death on the red line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released in the coming weeks.

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